Halford E. Jones Filipino Martial Arts Collection


The Hawaii Karate Museum is very proud to feature materials on the Filipino Martial Arts donated by Halford E. Jones. Here in Hawaii, there is considerable cross training among the various arts. Many Kenpo Karate instructors, for example, also studied Escrima. Many Okinawan Karate instructors also studied, lived and were even born in the Philippines. The Halford E. Jones Filipino Martial Arts Collection gives us a glimpse into the diverse martial arts of the Philippines.

Please visit this page often as we continue to list materials.

About Halford E. Jones. Halford E. Jones considers himself a martial arts enthusiast, a sometimes practitioner of martial arts, and an occasional writer on the subject. He has been fortunate enought to meet some of 'THE FATHERS': The Father of American Karate, The Father of Philippine Karate, the Father of Malaysian Karate, the Father of American Kenpo, and the Father of Modern Arnis, whom everyone should know, he says, if they have done their homework. Aside from that, Jones started his formal lessons in Judo in 1959 at a YMCA in Morristown, New Jersey, and when, time permitted, during his term of military service, where he found out about Karate and Aikido. Prior to all this, everything had been impromptu and sporadic, from childhood upwards.

In 1963, he caught a gllimpse of Karate, Aikido, Kendo, Jiujitsu, Sumo, etc. while spending three months in Hawaii, mostly on the Big Island, and then went to the Philippines until 1965, after which he traveled to Hong Kong, Cambodia, Burma, India, Egypt, Jordan (Jersusalem), Lebanon, Greece, Italy, and Spain. He returned to the Philippines for another two years (1966 to 1968), then returned to the US after visiting Japan, and then returned to the Philippines in 1972, shortly after martial law had been declared by President Marcos. He remained there for about eight years and returned to the US in 1981. Since that time, he has taken three trips back.

Over the years, Jones has kept up a fair amount of correspondence with various martial artists and groups around the world and was Executive Editor for Filipino Martial Arts Magazine. He also had contributed numerous articles to many of the various martial arts magazines in the US.


Filipino Martial Arts Magazine

Volume 1, No. 1, February 1998, through Volume 6, No. 2, 2004.

Donated by Halford E. Jones

filipino1-1
Volume 1, No. 1
Feb 1998
filipino1-2
Volume 1, No. 2
March/April 1998
filipino1-3
Volume 1, No. 3
May/June 1998
filipino1-4
Volume 1, No. 4
July/August 1998
filipino1-5
Volume 1, No. 5
Sept/Oct 1998
filipino1-6
Volume 1, No. 6
Nov/Dec 1998
filipino2-1
Volume 2, No. 1
1999
filipino2-2
Volume 2, No. 2
1999
filipino2-3
Volume 2, No. 3
1999
filipino2-4
Volume 2, No. 4
2000
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Volume 2, No. 5
2000
filipino2-6
Volume 2, No. 6
2001
filipino3-1
Volume 3, No. 1
2001
filipino3-2
Volume 3, No. 2
2001
filipino4-1
Volume 4, No. 1
2002
filipino4-2
Volume 4, No. 2
2002
filipino4-3
Volume 4, No. 3
2002
filipino4-4
Volume 4, No. 4
2002
filipino5-1
Volume 5, No. 1
2003
filipino5-2
Volume 5, No. 2
2003
filipino6-1
Volume 6, No. 1
2004
filipino6-1
Volume 6, No. 2
2004

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